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Author Topic: Forgetting or ignoring history part 2  (Read 2036 times)

yannessa_is_god

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Re: Forgetting or ignoring history part 2
« Reply #180 on: November 01, 2019, 04:40:49 PM »

Keeping in mind that impeachment is for "high crimes and misdemeanors..."

It would be one thing if there was no evidence of a crime, but in this case not only did the White House itself release a transcript of the President committing a crime (abusing his power for something of personal gain....dirt on a political rival), his own team and former team members have either wittingly or unwittingly admitted that this President committed a crime (think Mulvaney admitting out loud that this is how this White House does business).

There is nothing "Banana Republic" about Congress doing it's job. Them not impeaching him for political gain (i.e. being afraid of backlash at the voting booth) for have been much more morally wrong than what they are doing currently, which is clearly doing the right thing.

It's ok to support a criminal POTUS...that is your right (Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton were two of the most popular Presidents of the Twentieth Century).. But to make false equivalencies or even worse against the side trying to prosecute criminal activity is either being intellectually dishonest, being outright dishonest, or admitting that you have not watched or read the news over the past two months.

Unrelated, but those paranoid about the media, ANOTHER actual news journalist left Fox News yesterday. Catherine Herridge left just 20 days after Shep Smith left. Both on their way out made mention that facts matter (both taking shots at FNC). Be careful from where you consume your media...
« Last Edit: November 01, 2019, 04:53:19 PM by yannessa_is_god »
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BALDWINTRACK

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Re: Forgetting or ignoring history part 2
« Reply #181 on: November 01, 2019, 08:16:41 PM »

Well FOX competes with MSNBC and CNN. All three are fake.
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yannessa_is_god

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Re: Forgetting or ignoring history part 2
« Reply #182 on: November 02, 2019, 09:24:56 AM »

To your point Herridge is going to CBS News, probably the most respected of the broadcast networks evening news.

Shep is unemployed but I'm sure someone of his stature (making 7 digits) probably has a noncompete clause for a while. With thay said he will almost certainly resurface at a nice news gig.
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RyanHS93

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Re: Forgetting or ignoring history part 2
« Reply #183 on: November 02, 2019, 05:25:49 PM »

Coach  I have to agree  So sad what's happening  The good news 48% of American people polled DO NOT want removal. Assuming no movement that will allow the Senate to quickly dismiss this non sense  I believe 51 votes can lead to dismissal    So far 18 witnesses called for a 29 minute phone call LOL  Month long investigation after wasting 40 million on the Russian Collusion Delusion   

emm8   Really surprised you didn't knock Trump for the lousy unemployment rate  3.5 jump to 3.6%  If you remember knocking the prior months job report    Septemberís number was revised up to 180,000 from 136,000 


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BALDWINTRACK

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Re: Forgetting or ignoring history part 2
« Reply #184 on: November 06, 2019, 07:18:37 AM »

Unless Trump is his own entity heís in an awful lot of trouble next year. Democrats are at an all time high watermark all OVR the place.

For a Democrat to be elected governor of Kentucky we are talking about a 15-20 point swing from normalcy.
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yannessa_is_god

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Re: Forgetting or ignoring history part 2
« Reply #185 on: November 06, 2019, 08:34:34 AM »

While everything that you say is true this was only a minor to moderate upset for a few reasons.

One is that the incumbent Bevin was I believe the least popular governor in the country (mostly for reasons that you will see below).

The other is that the Democrat Beshear is a second generation of a popular and recent governor (his dad was Bevin's predecessor). The older Beshear was a popular governor who was term limited. He expanded medicade which I do not know if it was popular at the time or not but in retrospect is now popular because of what Bevin did (he gutted their exchanges in a Trumpian/Rand Paulian way).

Healthcare was probably the biggest issue. While Kentucky has never been a healthy state (usually in the bottom 11 whether lead by a Republican or a Democrat), their life expectancy has fallen for three straight years under Bevin and the states' other health measures and metrics have suffered under Bevin's leadership, directly correlated to his health care plan vs the Obama/Beshear era.

With that said while this is a nice win for Dems it isn't a horrible loss for Republicans. For one, Bevin was a nemesis of their own Senior Senator Mitch McConell. Second Kentucky is not in play in the 2020 general election by any measure. Turnout for an offcycle Gubernatorial race is almost always going to be lower than a Presidential election. If anything, only losing by around 4700 votes (give or take depending on where the absentees and provisional ballots end up) despite being so unpopular has to be reassuring for Trump, as the Trump voter proved in Alabama when voting for a child molester a couple of years ago and again with a very unpopular governor that they will vote for whoever has the R by their name so long that they support or at least do not oppose Trump. Also keeping in mind that the Libertarian got 28000 votes, in the case of Bevin and his policies almost certainly would have taken votes from Bevin. The only bad for Republicans is that this was the first litmus as to whether impeachment would galvanize Republicans more, which it clearly did not. From all accounts impeachment did not really impact this election either way.

For Dems the lesson simply is that in states like this in particular a moderate Democrat can win. Healthcare was the biggest topic of discussion, not impeachment. They do need message discipline. The other good trend for them is that they continue to expand their vote in the suburban areas. They have owned urban while the GOP has owned rural. In this case much like other recent elections they improved in suburban areas. They also won a few rural counties in this case.
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RyanHS93

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Re: Forgetting or ignoring history part 2
« Reply #186 on: November 06, 2019, 08:36:55 AM »

Well Said God  My thoughts exactly  I cant believe Bevin was that close Even at the rally he seemed like a A HOLE

I don't think so  I followed some of that and the Democrat seemed like the better choice IMO   The other five running in Kentucky all won and some won big   

Louisville decided the election 
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BALDWINTRACK

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Re: Forgetting or ignoring history part 2
« Reply #187 on: November 06, 2019, 07:49:53 PM »

I was in Louisville recently. Really enjoyed the city.
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RyanHS93

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Re: Forgetting or ignoring history part 2
« Reply #188 on: November 07, 2019, 08:15:30 PM »

My eyes will be on Louisiana  Trump should help flip that seat if he still has juice 

How about that attorney for the whistleblower   Past tweets are real bad  One said CNN will help take down Trump 
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BALDWINTRACK

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Re: Forgetting or ignoring history part 2
« Reply #189 on: November 08, 2019, 08:47:58 AM »

People are in Trump fatigue. I like him as a president but Iíd literally vote for anybody over him at this point because Iím exhausted by him. That in my mind will be his downfall.
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coach99

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Re: Forgetting or ignoring history part 2
« Reply #190 on: November 08, 2019, 11:24:28 AM »

The media is making a big deal about 'flipping' the states representation and so forth, but I really think that will have little to do with Trump getting elected.  The people may be fed up with the local political scene and changing it up, with the sorry slate of Dem Presidential candidates, I don't see them winning the big one.
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yannessa_is_god

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Re: Forgetting or ignoring history part 2
« Reply #191 on: Today at 02:15:28 PM »

I've been meaning to respond coach99 (I've been in football and hockey mode over politics mode lol).

But I mostly agree with your take about not every election being a referendum on Trump. That is not giving the voters themselves enough credit.

In the case of Virginia that was not at all a surprise...that state seems to be becoming bluer by the election. Literally nothing to see here. Regarding Kentucky the Democrat that is winning ran a "local election" to the point of coach99, focusing on issues that matter in Kentucky, as opposed to the incumbent Republican Bevin who nearing election day ran an anti-impeachment campaign (which is absurd considering that the governor of a state has zero vote on impeachment of the POTUS, is not in line for succession should removal happen, etc). All that he or she can do is maybe shape public opinion. Again credit to the voters for seeing through that. I have no doubt that Kentucky voters as a majority support Trump, but supporting (or opposing) Trump is the job of their Senators and Representatives, not their governor.

Where I disagree some is that in most midterms, after a new President is elected, the opposite party does well usually in united opposition to the new POTUS. While the Dems had  particularly big gains against a uniquely unpopular POTUS, this trend has been normal since 1994 at least. Dems in 2018 did run a campaign focused on Trump's tax cuts and attacks on health care, and it paid off. With that said it usually still takes a strong candidate to turn a seat or to primary someone of the same party. And it takes the voters to think for themselves on said candidates and issues.
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