PSB

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

News:

Welcome to the New PSB

Author Topic: WPIAL Girls Volleyball on MSA....  (Read 103 times)

Bob.Gregg.WJPA.Radio

  • Hall of Fame
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4030
  • That's why they actually PLAY the games....
WPIAL Girls Volleyball on MSA....
« on: September 21, 2017, 09:34:52 PM »

Listening to a broadcast....
Can't help but laugh at this line early in the fifth set....

"This one's back and forth.  It's like it could come down to who scores last...."

Really?  EVERY volleyball match comes down to who scores last.  LOL
« Last Edit: September 21, 2017, 09:44:43 PM by Bob.Gregg.WJPA.Radio »
Logged

coach99

  • Hall of Fame
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 8672
Re: WPIAL Girls Volleyball on MSA....
« Reply #1 on: September 21, 2017, 11:00:46 PM »

Some sports are just not made for radio....I think volleyball is one of them.  I really think you have to see the kills and sets, etc. that can't really be described well.  Sort of like tennis.  Nothing against the announcers..but it just seems futile :)  The listener really has to have a good mental image of that sport.
Logged

Bob.Gregg.WJPA.Radio

  • Hall of Fame
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4030
  • That's why they actually PLAY the games....
Re: WPIAL Girls Volleyball on MSA....
« Reply #2 on: September 22, 2017, 08:54:45 AM »

Coach, I understand your point but let me ask you this:
If you didn't understand football, would you understand that game on the radio?

While it may be difficult to describe, volleyball (and other sports) can be effectively communicated.

Key pieces for all broadcasters to remember to communicate:

What's the score?
How much time is left?
On what part of the competition surface is the action occurring?
Who is controlling the action?

Even if you don't understand volleyball, if THOSE pieces are communicated, you can at least get a picture of who's winning and how much time is left.

The way those items are described change by sport, but those are the crucial pieces for all broadcasts.

What's the score:  this one's pretty standard in nearly every sport, track meets being one exception.

How much time is left:  could be time, could be periods/rounds, could be innings, could be laps, could be jumps/throws/dives.
This one requires not only what the clock, but specifics within--how many periods/rounds/innings/laps/jumps/throws/dives are there.

Where on the competition surface is the action taking place:  25-yard line, edge of the mat, infield/outfield/fair/foul, the back stretch, at the net, in the lane.
Like "time" this also requires additional specifics--which end, near-side hash, whose dugout, etc.

Who's controlling the action:  pitcher/batter/fielder, quarterback/running back/receiver/kicker/defender, top man/bottom man/neutral position, goalie/forward/midfielder/defender, leader, etc.

These pieces are all helpful, particularly to people may not know the intricacies of a sport but know participants in a specific event.  You referenced volleyball.  If you had heard the score, what the end-goal is (25 or 15 points), which team is serving/hitting/blocking, how many games each team had won (and that it's a best of five match), whether the ball was in or out, blocked or down, you would have a better "mind's eye" picture of what's happening.

Sometimes, announcers who know the sport well fail to communicate these pieces, forgetting that not every is as familiar with a particular sport.

Sometimes, listeners get miffed at announcers who re-iterate these specifics because they (the listeners) know them already, ignoring the fact that other listeners don't.
« Last Edit: September 22, 2017, 03:21:21 PM by Bob.Gregg.WJPA.Radio »
Logged